RadonAware News Releases

  • District of MacKenzie encourages residents to become radon aware [PDF] - 386KB

    APRIL 7, 2016 - The District of Mackenzie is encouraging homeowners and building owners to learn more about the effects of radon.
  • Find out faster if you have a potential radon problem

    MARCH 3, 2016 - The BC Lung Association has partnered with Radon Environmental Management Corp to provide a fast and accurate way to find out if your home, school or workplace has potentially unhealthy indoor radon levels - the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking.

    BC Lung Association offers faster way to identify home radon risk

    The BC Lung Association has partnered with Radon Environmental Management Corp to provide a fast and accurate way to find out if your home, school or workplace has potentially unhealthy indoor radon levels - the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking.  

    Waiting for months to find out if your home, school or workplace’s indoor radon levels are a lung cancer risk is not easy. No one should have to suffer from preventable radon-caused lung cancer,” said Scott McDonald, CEO of the BC Lung Association.

    “Until now we offered only long term radon test kits. Today we’re excited to offer both short and long term radon testing products for air and water thanks to our new partnership with Radon Environmental,” continued McDonald.

    “Both short term tests can give people a sense of whether or not their home, school or workplace is potentially at-risk for unhealthy indoor radon levels within 48 hours to a month depending on which of two short-term testing options is chosen, "said Alan Whitehead, CEO of Vancouver-based company Radon Environmental Management Corp, providers of scientifically accurate solutions for radon testing and mitigation. "This is much faster than a long term test which takes three months to a year."

    Two short-term options are available. One provides radon test results within a few days for $250-$300 and the other, which takes 10 to 30 days and provides results within 10 days following test completion costs $60.

    The benefits to affordable short term testing are particularly helpful to real estate professionals, new home builders, and building inspectors. Patty Leclerc-Zanet, a Certified Realtor from Trail, BC understands the benefits to short term testing.

    “If a client is spending a lot of money to buy their dream home, and they know it’s in a radon risk area, they’re going to want a timely approach to find out if there’s an issue,” says Leclerc-Zanet.

    “We do recommend both a short and long term radon test be conducted,” said McDonald. “This is because radon levels can vary over time and especially from season to season. To be sure short term test results are accurate, we suggest people also do a long term test, thus monitoring radon levels for a minimum of three months to be sure they are consistently low or high over time.”

    “If it turns out your indoor radon levels exceed the recommended safety threshold, we advise installation of an active radon reduction system by a certified radon mitigation professional.”

    An active radon reduction system is a permanently installed pipe-and-fan system that places a direct vacuum on the soil beneath the house’s foundation, constantly reducing the amount of radon under the foundation that can penetrate into the living space of the home.

    To learn more about short term (and long term) testing and to purchase either or both test kits homeowners can visit RadonAware.ca where kits can be purchased online. Note:  Short and long term radon tests include delivery of confidential lab test results.

    About the BC Lung Association 

    The BC Lung Association is the leading BC organization working to save lives, prevent and improve lung health through research, advocacy, education and support. For more than 100 years, the Association has led the fight for healthy lungs and healthy air. When you can’t breathe, nothing else matters.

    About Radon Environmental Management Corp

    Radon Environmental Management Corp (Radon Environmental) is an environmental health and building sciences company focused on reducing public exposure to radon gas. Radon Environmental provides radon maps and mapping services and certified professional radon measurement services and radon detectors. The company also provides advanced performance mitigation products and funds the development of new radon measurement and remediation technologies.

    Media Contacts

    Britt Swoveland,
    RadonAware Manager
    BC Lung Association
    250.686.1597 E swoveland@bc.lung.ca

    Katrina van Bylandt
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association
    604.731.5864 E vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca

  • Vernon Native Housing Society puts tenant health first

    NOVEMBER 2, 2015 - The Vernon Native Housing Society is taking action to protect all tenants - living in any of its 22 facilities - from unnecessary radon-related lung cancer risk. The Society is testing radon levels this fall/winter and will implement radon reduction measures wherever necessary.

    Native Housing Society Takes Action to Protect Tenants from Lung Cancer Risk

    Kickwillie Place is one of 22 facilities under the Vernon Native Housing Society. Left to right are Vernon Native Housing Society staff members James Verheul, Karen Gerein, Trina Nash and Dawn Somers.

    The Vernon Native Housing Society (VHNS) is located in Area 1 of the Province of BC (see map), the region known to be at an increased risk for elevated levels of indoor radon gas.

    Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking - responsible for as much as 16 percent of lung cancer, and 3,200 lung cancer deaths, in Canada each year.

    “We want to ensure tenants living in our buildings are protected from unnecessary radon-related lung cancer risk,” said Karen Gerein, VNHS General Manager.

    “We know Vernon has indoor radon levels higher than what is considered safe by Health Canada standards and we want to ensure our residents are safe,” continued Gerein. 

    She recently purchased 22 radon test kits on behalf of the VNHS through the BC Lung Association RadonAware program.  

    “The VNHS has 22 buildings under its umbrella – including Kickwillie Place (see photo attached). We intend to radon test them all this fall and winter,” added Gerein.

    So committed are the VNHS, their building maintenance manager, James Verhuel, is completing his radon mitigation certification training.

    Verhuel will soon be certified to install a Radon Reduction System himself and is grateful for the guidance offered through the BC Lung Association.

    “We certainly hope our buildings’ test results come back below the Health Canada safety guideline, but should they be high, we’ll be prepared to fix the problem,” explained Verhuel.

    Other organizations, equally concerned about tenant health and safety, are taking notice of the VNHS’ initiative and hope to learn from their experience.

    Ray Gerow, CEO of BC’s Aboriginal Housing Management Association (AHMA) said, “High radon levels is a problem that potentially affects all of our 40-plus Aboriginal community-based organizations.

    “We congratulate the VNHS for taking steps towards bettering the future health and safety of homes under their care and we look forward to using Vernon Native’s newfound expertise and experience to address Radon issues throughout the province.”

    BC Lung Association RadonAware Manager Britt Swoveland emphasized the VHNS’ decision to train members of their own staff in radon mitigation.

    “It makes a lot of sense for larger housing providers like the VNHS to train their own staff to solve radon problems,” she said.

    “We were glad to be able to provide some support, and hope many more housing associations will follow the VNHS’s lead.”

    Media Contacts

    Britt Swoveland,
    Provincial RadonAware Coordinator
    BC Lung Association
    250.686.1597 swoveland@bc.lung.ca

    Katrina van Bylandt
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association
    604.731.5864 vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca

  • BC communities support Radon Aware Month

    OCTOBER 27, 2015 - Towns across BC have joined the BC Lung Association in proclaiming November Radon Aware month – Prince George, Kamloops, Penticton, Princeton, Trail, Creston, Nakusp, the Village of Salmo, Fort. St. James and Keremeos.


    The BC Lung Association Enlists the Support of BC Communities on Lung Cancer Prevention 

    BC Communities proclaim November Radon Aware Month


    Britt Swoveland, BC Lung Association with Councillor Marg Spina, City of Kamloops

     

    Vancouver - OCTOBER 27, 2015 - Towns across BC have joined the BC Lung Association in proclaiming November Radon Aware month – Prince George, Kamloops, Penticton, Princeton, Trail, Creston, Nakusp, the Village of Salmo, Fort. St. James and Keremeos.


    Radon gas exposure accounts for an average of 55 percent of a person’s lifetime radiation exposure – and for as many as 16 percent of all lung cancer deaths each year in Canada.

    “Radon is one of the most hazardous sources of indoor air pollution in Canada,” said Dr. Peter Paré, Chair of the BC Lung Association and Professor Emeritus of Respiratory Medicine at the University of British Columbia. “And BC community involvement is vital to making real progress on the issue.”

    “It’s encouraging how many BC community leaders have stepped up and spoken out in a short period to help keep BC families safe from radon-related lung cancer risk,” he continued. “It’s a serious issue and we expect community support will grow further.”

    “No one should have to suffer from preventable radon-caused lung cancer. Home radon testing is affordable, and relatively straightforward solutions exist to reduce radon to safe levels if it turns out the radon level in your home exceeds the recommended safety threshold,” he said.

    Affordable do-it-yourself radon test kits are available online at RadonAware.ca, which include home delivery of lab results.

    And while the BC Lung Association continues to promote community action, they’re also championing the issue with industry groups central to the development of a comprehensive solution.

    "To put a stop to radon-related lung cancer - building inspectors, builders and tradespeople, realtors, and home warranty organizations will all play a very significant role,” said Britt Swoveland, RadonAware Manager for the BC Lung Association.   

    “Radon policies and regulations need to be established to ensure both new and existing BC buildings are future-proofed from the risk of radon. And these policies need to be effectively enforced," she said.

    “Ultimately, it needs to become standard practice to address radon when buildings are constructed, financed, re-financed, insured, retrofitted or sold,” continued Swoveland. “As in the US and elsewhere, at some point, radon inspections will likely become a routine step in any real estate transaction”.

    “The BC Lung Association is right. To effectively address the threat that radon poses to public health, actions are required on many fronts,” said Dr. David Boyd, Environmental Lawyer, Author and Adjunct Professor at Simon Fraser University. “In addition to residential testing, there should be strategies to ensure that radon testing, and if necessary radon mitigation measures, are undertaken in all public buildings with priority given to schools and daycare facilities” he added.
     
    “The good news,” continued Dr. Boyd, “is that radon problems can be fixed, at a moderate cost, both in new home construction and in retrofitting  existing buildings. We just need to get on with it.”

    Media Contacts

    Britt Swoveland,
    Provincial RadonAware Coordinator
    BC Lung Association
    T 250.686.1597 swoveland@bc.lung.ca

    Katrina van Bylandt
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association
    T 604.731.5864 vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca

     

  • BC Lung Association & David Suzuki Foundation

    APRIL 28, 2015 - Is radon on your radar? It should be. New report calls on governments to step up action to reduce cancer-causing gas in indoor air. More >

    David Suzuki Foundation & BC Lung Association news release

    Is radon on your radar? It should be. Report calls on governments to step up action to reduce cancer-causing gas in indoor air

    VANCOUVER - April 28, 2015 - Health Canada should tighten its radon guideline to better protect Canadians from this radioactive gas, says a David Suzuki Foundation report released today. Naturally occurring in soils, radon can seep into buildings, accumulate and reach high levels in indoor air. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies radon as a known human carcinogen, yet fewer than half of Canadians have heard of radon, and fewer still recognize it as a health hazard.

    “Our national radon guideline is supposed to protect Canadians from this health hazard,” said Lisa Gue, senior researcher and analyst with the David Suzuki Foundation. “Why then is Health Canada’s guideline twice the level recommended by the World Health Organization?”

    Health Canada’s radon guideline, established in 2007, is 200 bequerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3 is a measure of radioactivity). Based on new evidence that radon causes a significant number of cancer cases even at concentrations lower than 200 Bq/m3, the World Health Organization recommends that countries establish a reference level of 100 Bq/m3. The David Suzuki Foundation found that leading countries have revised their radon standards over the past decade and several now target levels lower than 100 Bq/m3.

    The report recommends that Canada follow suit by lowering its target level and implementing complementary measures to ensure this revised standard is reached, including:

    • Radon prevention, testing and mitigation (where necessary) in daycares, schools, hospitals and other public-access buildings;
    • Incorporation and enforcement of radon prevention measures in provincial and territorial building codes;
    • Government incentives and subsidies to encourage homeowners to test for radon and facilitate mitigation where necessary; and,
    • Evaluate and implement innovative approaches to make radon “visible,” for example with a new requirement for digital radon monitors in homes and public-access buildings.


    The foundation also encourages individuals to test their homes for radon. Radon detectors can be purchased from some hardware stores, businesses specializing in radon detection and mitigation, the Radiation Safety Institute and lung associations across Canada.

    “Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking and is responsible for up to 16 per cent of lung cancer deaths in Canada,” said Scott McDonald, president and CEO of the British Columbia  Lung Association. “The only way to know if you’ve got a radon problem in your home is to run a test. If levels are high, they can be lowered. But testing is the first step!”

    The David Suzuki Foundation released the report to coincide with the 2015 Conference of the Canadian Association of Radon Scientists and Technicians (CARST) in Vancouver this week.

    Download the David Suzuki Foundation’s report at www.davidsuzuki.org/publications

     

    Media contacts:

    Theresa Beer
    Communications specialist
    David Suzuki Foundation
    778-874-3396
    tbeer@davidsuzuki.org


    Katrina van Bylandt
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association        
    604-731-5864
    vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca

  • BC home testing project results suggest more action needed

    JANUARY 26, 2015 - Today the BC Lung Association released the results of the largest ever community-wide home radon testing project done in Canada. More >

    BC community radon testing project results suggest more action is needed


    January 26, 2015Today the BC Lung Association released the results of the largest ever community-wide home radon testing project done in Canada.  Getting more British Columbians to test their homes for radon – the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking - is a priority for the BC Lung Association. As is ensuring people know how to mitigate a radon problem, if one exists.

    During winter 2014, radon test kits were distributed to more than 2000 homes in Prince George and 230 homes in Castlegar and surrounding areas – two areas of the province known to have elevated levels of indoor radon.  
     
    Measured in becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3), Health Canada recommends home radon levels not exceed a safety threshold of 200 (Bq/m3).

    On average, one in three Prince George homes and one in two Castlegar homes tested above Health Canada’s suggested safety threshold.
     
    For comprehensive testing project results, read the Prince George and Castlegar reports posted on the BC Lung Association’s website: RadonAware.ca
     
    “Is radon something British Columbians should think about? Yes. Should we panic? No,” said Scott McDonald, CEO of the BC Lung Association.  “The problem is too few British Columbians know what radon is, where it comes from, and how to fix a problem in your home if you have one.”
     
    “Outside, radon quickly dilutes to safe levels, but when trapped inside can build up to high levels and, over time, may cause lung cancer. The only way to know if you have a problem is to test. One house can have low levels of radon while the house right next door can be very high,” continued McDonald.
     
    “Should your home radon levels be high, there is no reason to be frightened, the problem can be fixed, but we do recommend hiring a certified mitigation professional,” said McDonald.
    “There are a number of ways to begin addressing the issue.”

    The most effective system for reducing radon levels involves installing an Active Radon Reduction System. This works by drawing the radon gas from beneath the building and venting it outside the home. This is proven to reduce radon levels to nearly undetectable levels.  And in most cases, radon mitigation costs range between $500 and $3,000.

    The BC Lung Association recommends all British Columbians test their homes and ensure home radon levels remain as low as possible. Given the results of the studies, the Association would like to see every home in Prince George and Castlegar tested for radon. To order a radon test kit or find a certified contractor in your region, go to www.RadonAware.ca.
     
    What the Prince George Study Revealed
     

    • Radon test kits were distributed to 2000 homes across 4 Prince George postal code service areas.
    • 71.5 percent (1436) of tests were returned for analysis after the required 3 month testing period.
    • Overall, 29 percent of homes tested had results that exceeded Health Canada’s radon exposure guideline for mitigation

    The Prince George Project was led by the BC Lung Association, funded by the BC Ministry of Health and supported by the Fraser Basin Council and the Canadian Cancer Society, B.C. & Yukon.  Download the full report.

     
    What the Castlegar Project Revealed

    • Radon test kits were distributed to 230 homes in Castlegar and surrounding areas.
    • 68.7 percent (158) of tests were returned for analysis after the required 3 month testing period.
    • Overall, 59 percent of homes tested had results that exceeded Health Canada’s radon exposure guideline.

    The Castlegar Study was led by the BC Lung Association, funded by the BC Ministry of Health and supported by the City of Castlegar.  Download the full report.

    Media Contacts

    Britt Swoveland,
    Provincial RadonAware Coordinator
    BC Lung Association
    T 250.686.1597 swoveland@bc.lung.ca

    Katrina van Bylandt
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association
    T 604.731.5864 vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca
     

     

  • New homeownersto be protected from radon risk of lung cancer

    NOVEMBER 12, 2014 - The BC Lung Association has applauded the BC government’s recent decision to require stronger protection from soil gases, such as radon, in new housing. More >

    New homeowners in British Columbia to be protected from radon risk of lung cancer

    November 12, 2014 - The BC Lung Association has applauded the BC government’s recent decision to require stronger protection from soil gases, such as radon, in new housing.

    “This is a huge gain for protecting public health,” said Britt Swoveland, Provincial RadonAware Coordinator for the BC Lung Association. “B.C.’s new radon Building Code protection requirement is among the strongest in Canada, and sets an example for other provinces to follow.”

    Effective December 19, to pass inspection and obtain occupancy permits all new housing in Area 1 of BC (see map diagram) must have a radon vent-pipe that extends from beneath the basement floor of the house and safely exhausts to the outdoors through the attic and out the roof. This system is also known as a ‘Passive Radon Reduction System.’

    Our research confirmed building regulations for radon currently in place were having little effect and substantiated the need for Code changes,” said Phil Markin, Building Services Director for the City of Castlegar and radon study partner.

    Current Code regulations only required the rough-in of a pipe from beneath a home’s basement floor extending up through the slab floor and capped off. This is also known as a ‘capped pipe system’.

    Our findings established the minimum requirement for effective home radon protection in new construction should be the installation of a radon vent pipe,” said Swoveland. “But it’s important to note that while our study confirmed installation of a radon vent pipe consistently reduced radon levels, it didn’t consistently succeed in reducing radon below the Health Canada recommended safety threshold. What did was the addition of a fan at the top of the radon vent pipe which serves to pull radon gas up and out of the home (also known as an ‘Active Radon Reduction System’).

    To help lay the foundation for radon-related Building Code changes, the BC Lung Association partnered with the City of Castlegar during the winter of 2014 to assess the effectiveness of radon mitigation systems in newer homes. Research was conducted in 16 homes in the Castlegar/Nelson area and Prince George and in October 2014, results were shared with the Ministry Responsible for Housing, Building and Construction Standards Branch.

    “In future, we suggest the government consider radon testing be required as a condition of new home occupancy, and, where test results are high, the addition of a fan be required,” added Swoveland. “The good news for now is that a homeowner can, if warranted, fairly easily and inexpensively add a fan themselves.”

    Fueling action on radon is a priority for the BC Lung Association.

    Radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer, is a colourless, odourless, radioactive gas that comes from the breakdown of uranium in the ground, and can seep undetected into homes and build up to unhealthy levels.

    “Is radon something British Columbians should be wary of? Yes. Should we panic? No.” said Swoveland. “But we do encourage all British Columbians to test their homes, and to mitigate if radon levels are high.”


    Media contacts:

    Britt Swoveland,
    Provincial RadonAware Coordinator
    BC Lung Association
    T 250.686.1597 E swoveland@bc.lung.ca

    Katrina van Bylandt,
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association
    T 604.731.5864 E vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca
  • Building Code: New Radon Requirements [PDF] - 330KB

    SEPTEMBER 19 - 2014 - On December 19, 2014,new requirements for protection from soil gases become effective.BC Building Code provisions for the rough-in for a subfloor depressurization system require installation of a radon vent pipe which extends through, and terminates outside the building.
  • Prince George homeowners urged to test for radon.

    JANUARY 8, 2014 - An indoor radon study led by the BC Lung Association is making FREE radon test kits available to Prince George families during the month of January. More >

    Homeowners Urged to Test for Radon - FREE Kits Available in Prince George

    Prince George - January 8, 2014 – An indoor radon study led by the BC Lung Association is making FREE radon test kits available to Prince George families during the month of January. This in response to preliminary radon testing in the Prince George area indicating elevated indoor radon levels that could pose a health risk.

    The free kits are available now through radon study partners the Fraser Basin Council and the Canadian Cancer Society or by mail from the BC Lung Association.

    For more info on radon and to get a free radon kit, please contact:

    BC Lung Association
    2675 Oak Street
    Vancouver V6H 2K2
    TF 1.800.665.5864
        
    Fraser Basin Council
    207 -155 George Street
    Prince George V2L 1P8
    T 250.961.4524
       
    Cancer Society
    Kordyban Lodge
    1100 Alward Street
    Prince George V2M 7B1
    T 250.562.3535

    Radon gas exposure is the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking – yet many people have never heard of radon gas nor are they aware of the known health risks.

    “Our goal is to inform residents about the cancer risk associated with radon so they can protect themselves against potential exposure,” says Scott McDonald, CEO of the BC Lung Association. “We hope Prince George homeowners will take advantage of this opportunity and take action that could impact their health.”

    “Health Canada estimates as much as 16 percent of lung cancer deaths in Canada are caused by radon and that an estimated 500,000 Canadians are living in homes that exceed the federal guidelines for radon gas exposure,” added McDonald. “Our study aims to better understand the types of homes that have high radon levels and inform future improvements in BC health policies and building construction standards.”

    Exposure to radon during childhood increases the lifetime risk of developing lung cancer. If a child lives in a home with a very high radon concentration for only a few years, the risk of developing lung cancer later in life could be equivalent to a lifetime exposure to moderate radon concentration.

    "There are no immediate symptoms related to radon exposure and no known health effects other than lung cancer. There are also no medical tests available to see if you have been exposed to radon," says Tiffany Bonnett, Program Coordinator for the Fraser Basin Council. "It is recommended that everyone test their home to determine if they are being exposed to radon."

    “We recommend measuring radon levels in the home to make sure they meet Health Canada's guidelines and that action is taken quickly to reduce radon levels if they are higher than the guideline,” says Kerensa Medhurst of the Canadian Cancer Society. “Testing or measuring indoor radon levels is the only way to see if you are at risk of exposure.”

    If your home does test positive for high levels of radon there are certified radon mitigation contractors who can help you to fix your home or can advise you of the best next steps.

    For more information on the risk of radon and radon testing visit www.radonaware.com.

    Media contacts:

    Britt Swoveland,
    Provincial RadonAware Coordinator
    BC Lung Association
    T 250.686.1597 E swoveland@bc.lung.ca

    Katrina van Bylandt,
    Communications Manager
    BC Lung Association
    T 604.731.5864 E vanbylandt@bc.lung.ca

  • Castlegar homeowners urged to test for radon

    JANUARY 8, 2014 - During the month of January, an indoor radon study led by the BC Lung Association together with the City of Castlegar is making FREE radon test kits available to Castlegar and surrounding area families. More >

    Homeowners Urged to Test for Radon - FREE Kits Available in Castlegar

    Castlegar, BC - January 8, 2014 – During the month of January, an indoor radon study led by the BC Lung Association together with the City of Castlegar is making FREE radon test kits available to Castlegar and surrounding area families. The free kits are available now through the City of Castlegar, contact:

    Phil Markin. Director of Development Services
    City of Castlegar, 460 Columbia Avenue
    T 250-365-8960

    The Association is also testing new homes to confirm the effectiveness of radon building code requirements in effect since 2006.

    Both efforts are in response to preliminary test data that indicates a significant number of Castlegar and surrounding area homes have high radon levels which could pose a health risk.

    Radon gas exposure is the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking – yet many people have never heard of radon gas nor are they aware of the known health risks.

    “Our goal is to inform residents about the cancer risk associated with radon so they can protect themselves against potential exposure. We also hope to gather information that will help us better understand the types of homes with high radon levels and help inform future improvements to BC health policies and building construction standards,” says Scott McDonald, CEO of the BC Lung Association.

    “We urge Castlegar and surrounding area homeowners to take advantage of this opportunity and take action that could impact their health,” he continued. “Health Canada estimates as much as 16 percent of lung cancer deaths in Canada are caused by radon and that an estimated 500,000 Canadians are living in homes that exceed the federal guidelines for radon gas exposure. Radon is a serious public health issue.”

    Exposure to radon during childhood increases the lifetime risk of developing lung cancer. If a child lives in a home with a very high radon concentration for only a few years, the risk of developing lung cancer later in life could be equivalent to a lifetime exposure to moderate radon concentration.

    There are no immediate symptoms related to radon exposure and no known health effects other than lung cancer. There are also no medical tests available to see if you have been exposed to radon.

    “The Province has identified Castlegar as one of the 56 locations in BC that may be at elevated risk from the presence of high radon levels. Therefore, we recommend measuring radon levels in the home to make sure they meet Health Canada's guidelines and to take action quickly to reduce radon levels if they are higher than the guideline,” says Phil Markin, Director of Development Services for the City of Castlegar. “Testing or measuring indoor radon levels is the only way to see if you are at risk of exposure.”

    “If your home does test positive for high levels of radon there are certified radon mitigation contractors who can help you to fix your home or can advise you of the best next steps,” Markin added.